The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood || Book Review

This is a series I so want to watch but I made myself a promise that I will first read the books.

I’m aware of the fact that the two differ quite a bit, which isn’t a surprise because there are very few cases where adaptations are 100% true to the books.

That hasn’t discouraged me to still continue with this plan. I still want to read The Testaments, the follow-up book and then binge-watch the show.

I have no idea why I never picked this book up earlier because OMW, it’s so worth the read! This was my book of the month choice for September 2022.

DISCLAIMER: This review could contain possible spoilers based on my opinions. All opinions and views are my own.

Book review: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood #bookreview #margaretatwood #dystopianbooks #thehandmaidstale #classicbooks #booktwt #bookaddict #booktwitter

Originally published: 1985

Pages: 311
Format: E-book

Plot from GoodReads:

The Handmaid’s Tale is a novel of such power that the reader will be unable to forget its images and its forecast. Set in the near future, it describes life in what was once the United States and is now called the Republic of Gilead, a monotheocracy that has reacted to social unrest and a sharply declining birthrate by reverting to, and going beyond, the repressive intolerance of the original Puritans. The regime takes the Book of Genesis absolutely at its word, with bizarre consequences for the women and men in its population. 

The story is told through the eyes of Offred, one of the unfortunate Handmaids under the new social order. In condensed but eloquent prose, by turns cool-eyed, tender, despairing, passionate, and wry, she reveals to us the dark corners behind the establishment’s calm facade, as certain tendencies now in existence are carried to their logical conclusions. 

Thoughts:

This is a very thought-provoking book and it will bring on a lot of emotions, anger being one of the strongest ones.

A women’s worth is based on how fertile she is – if she hits the right mark, she’s used to repopulate. If she isn’t, she’s placed in a different situation where she is more suited, and some of those situations are horrifying (but then again, which ones in this book aren’t). Continued misuse and abuse, and easily replaced.

The story is told by Offred, in first person POV, as she shares about her life in the regime and you get to hear her inner thoughts and struggles. It also presents a more painful angle to her story because she has memories of life prior to the regime and it’s sad to find out about everything that was stripped away from her.

The book focuses on extremism, and while some might think it’s just a work of fiction, there is still so much truth to the concepts in the book that we see in modern life.

Abuse of power, gender specifications and making out women as the weaker gender to exploit. While you’re fed the idea that men are behind the whole idea, you can’t miss the fact that women in this book are just as guilty. That there are women out there who will trample others to get where they need to. Not everyone believes in the same ideology as well as the means to create it. We often make the assumption that all women want the same thing or stand up for the same cause.

The story telling is intelligent and insightful, carrying a message of warning as well as hope.

My Rating:

The book has a rating of 4.13 on GoodReads. I gave it a 5.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood #bookreview #margaretatwood #dystopianbooks #thehandmaidstale #classicbooks #bookaddict #booktwitter

Have you read The Handmaid’s Tale?


The easiest way to stay up to date with the latest posts is to subscribe to the blog!


Do you have a book you want reviewed?
Send me an email: sincerelyyoursannie@gmail.com

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.

4 comments

  1. You nailed this review! I agree that this story is relevant to today’s times. The ending though was such a cliff hanger. Awesome job!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s