The Dark Between Stars and Other Poems || Mini Reviews

Finally, a few collections of poetry that weren’t too much of an eye-sore reading.

While the first two didn’t hit the mark for me, the last two were a breath of fresh air – to read something that wasn’t reworded from a different collection.

The last two didn’t get the highest rating I usually give books/poetry I absolutely loved, but were still good enough to get into the higher range than some of the others.

DISCLAIMER: This review could contain possible spoilers based on my opinions. All opinions and views are my own.

The Dark Between Stars by Atticus

Originally published: 2018

Pages: 240
Format:
E-book

Thoughts:

I’ve read so many beautiful pieces all over Pinterest by Atticus so I thought that trying a complete collection would be just as fruitful. It wasn’t. Most of of the pieces came across as tiny motivational speeches, designed to be read at the right moment, fit to be posted on Tumblr than be book-worthy content. I struggled to relate to anything in the first two sections with no pieces jumping off the pages. The last section was a complete blur of confusion and made no sense to the previous two sections. It was just a bunch of random topics thrown together with no real relations to each other. Not a good start to trying more collections from Atticus after reading this one.

My Rating:

The book has a rating of 3.97 on GoodReads. I gave it a 2.

Mini Reviews of The Dark Between Stars and Other Poems #minireviews #poetry #modernpoetry #poetryreview

the sun and her flowers by rupi kaur

Originally published: 2018

Pages: 256
Format:
E-book

Thoughts:

I wasn’t going into this collection with high hopes after reading milk and honey, and that was a complete disaster, but while this collection was a little better, it didn’t stand out to me as much. Some of the pieces are just repetitive, reworded to try something else but it was clear to see it’s the same thing over and over again. The pieces are about self-love, immigration and feminism, a mix of all throughout the book but I think the idea was good, but each should’ve had their own book per topic, and a little less repetition in each one. You don’t need to shove everything you have on the table into one book to make it mean something.

My Rating:

The book has a rating of 4.11 on GoodReads. I gave it a 3.

More reviews from this author

milk and honey by rupi kaur

And Still I Rise by Maya Angelou

Originally published: 1978

Pages: 100
Format: E-book

Thoughts:

This is a beautiful collection of poems of encouragement for women, specifically of colour, that they can do great things, they can achieve their goals and dreams. Emotionally moving and empowering writing can be found in most of the pieces, even if some of them spoke about the same problems and struggles. The message is clear and carried across in a beautiful manner.

My Rating:

The book has a rating of 4.41 on GoodReads. I gave it a 4.

Black Book of Poems by Vincent K. Hunanyan

Originally published: 2018

Pages: 100
Format: E-book

Thoughts:

While most of the pieces in the collection are simplistic and easy to understand, I found a couple of the pieces to not be as clear with their message or theme. I really tried, but failed with this. Most of the poems have a dark edge to them yet still contain enough ‘light‘ to not be completely absorbed. There are a couple of topics covered in the book but there was no confusion moving between them and losing sight of the collection as a whole. The short stories weren’t of much interest to me, but that’s mostly because I’m not a fan of them being added to poetry books as it breaks the flow of reading and the rhythm in the collection.

My Rating:

The book has a rating of 3.37 on GoodReads. I gave it a 4.

Have you read any of these poetry books?


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